This is the blog of a starving college student, equipped with some outdated tech, the attention span of a goldfish, and is a kid at heart. Follow at your own risk.

 

laboratoryequipment:

Nanoparticles Deliver High Doses of Antibiotics to BacteriaOver the past several decades, scientists have faced challenges in developing new antibiotics even as bacteria have become increasingly resistant to existing drugs. One strategy that might combat such resistance would be to overwhelm bacterial defenses by using highly targeted nanoparticles to deliver large doses of existing antibiotics.In a step toward that goal, researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women’s Hospital have developed a nanoparticle designed to evade the immune system and home in on infection sites, then unleash a focused antibiotic attack.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Nanoparticles-Deliver-High-Doses-of-Antibiotics-to-Bacteria-050712.aspx

Makes me wonder if this’ll just cause bacteria to evolve even more and become resistant to that!   Crazy!

laboratoryequipment:

Nanoparticles Deliver High Doses of Antibiotics to Bacteria

Over the past several decades, scientists have faced challenges in developing new antibiotics even as bacteria have become increasingly resistant to existing drugs. One strategy that might combat such resistance would be to overwhelm bacterial defenses by using highly targeted nanoparticles to deliver large doses of existing antibiotics.

In a step toward that goal, researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women’s Hospital have developed a nanoparticle designed to evade the immune system and home in on infection sites, then unleash a focused antibiotic attack.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news-Nanoparticles-Deliver-High-Doses-of-Antibiotics-to-Bacteria-050712.aspx

Makes me wonder if this’ll just cause bacteria to evolve even more and become resistant to that!   Crazy!

What happens when you give Kindles to kids in Ghana? Results:

courtenaybird:

  • Kids learned to use e-readers quickly even though 43 percent of them had never used a computer before. Also, not surprisingly, they were quick to discover “the multimedia aspects of the e-reader, such as music and Internet features.”
  • Near-zero theft. Only two e-readers (out of 600) were lost in the whole study, partly because “community involvement was encouraged through e-reader pledges, community outreach programs, and support from community leaders.”
  • Kids got access to way more books. Before the study, primary-school students had access to an average of 3.6 books at home. Junior-high students had access to an average of 8.6 books at home and high-school students access to an average of 11 books. With the e-reader program, kids had access to an average of 107 book.
  • Primary school students’ test scores improved, but effects on older kids were less clear. The reading scores of primary-school students who received e-readers increased from 12.9 percent to 15.7 percent. But results for older kids were mixed.
  • Students sought out access to international news. “Amazon data revealed that students were downloading The New York Times, USA Today, and El País etc., demonstrating that students want to access a wide range of reading materials that were previously inaccessible.”
  • Kindles break too easily. Worldreader had not predicted how many Kindles would break: 243 out of 600, or 40.5 percent. 
  • The program appears cost-effective. Worldreader estimates that “for the years 2014-2018, using a calculation focused strictly on the provisioning of textbooks, the e-reader system would cost only $8.93-$11.40 more per student over a 4 year period [$0.19 to $0.24 per month] than the traditional paper book system.”

futurescope:

Universal Real-Time Translator 

AT&T is bringing the universal translator to an app store near you. Well, Granted, it isn’t quite universal yet. For now, the AT&T Translator is capable of seven languages. So far the app supports English, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese and Spanish. It seems reasonable to assume that if the app catches on that more languages will eventually be added.
The app was developed at AT&T Research Labs, using both AT&T Watson and AT&T Natural Voices speech technologies. Usage is simple. Speak a phrase into your device and the Translator converts what you’ve said into the language of your choice before broadcasting it to listeners. […]

Video: 

[via] [AT&T Labs]

futurescope:

Universal Real-Time Translator 

AT&T is bringing the universal translator to an app store near you. Well, Granted, it isn’t quite universal yet. For now, the AT&T Translator is capable of seven languages. So far the app supports English, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese and Spanish. It seems reasonable to assume that if the app catches on that more languages will eventually be added.


The app was developed at AT&T Research Labs, using both AT&T Watson and AT&T Natural Voices speech technologies. Usage is simple. Speak a phrase into your device and the Translator converts what you’ve said into the language of your choice before broadcasting it to listeners. […]

Video:

[via] [AT&T Labs]